Across the border (barely) in Mexico, a Palm Sunday parade by the local youth and a Catholic (of course) Priest. (IPhone photo)


In Brownsville, looks like a church, quacks like a church, walks like a church so it is the main City Hall for Brownsville.  Fooled you, huh? (IPhone photo)

Hanging out on Padre Island National Sea Shore, Corpus Christi, TX

I betcha, you never thought about this, that a rotor, as shown above on this Air Force helicopter, spins at a faster speed at the tips, then at the hub.  You can see it on this photo where the rotor hub is sharply focused while the rotor tips are blurring because they are rotating too fast to be stopped by the photo speed.  Same thing on a CD or DVD, the data at the center is being read at a lower speed then the data at the outer limits of the disk.  This makes it more difficult to recover the data at the outer limits of the CD then at the center.  Sorry, every once in a while I revert to my engineering roots.  Posted for your enjoyment!  Notice that the Helicopter is unmarked except for the insignia on the side which is difficult to see.  Betcha, cant find it.  Hint: look under the turbine exhaust.




This is a White Tailed Hawk Buteo albicaudatus.  It's range in U.S. is only on the Southeast coast of TX. (Taken at Padre Island, Corpus Christi, TX)




"Hey Paul, which war did you lose your leg in?"  G U 11s (gulls) on the Gulf Coast of Corpus Christi, Texas.  The "Laughing Gull"  Leucophaeus atricilla.  Probably why the lame war joke. These birds commonly pull up one leg when they are perched like this.  I think they do this to conserve body heat or maybe they do it because they can.  When they get older, they use a hiking stick and both legs.


A couple of Royal Terns Thallasseus maximus Strikingly odd to me.  Like a gull that got its DNA mixed up.  They look to me to be more like Herons then Terns.


These are Cattle Egrets Bubulcus ibis, Not something we usually see in California but according to the range map, a possibility.  (I've never seen one, in CA.)


Great Egrets Ardea alba, cruising almost like Pelicans, only not as organized.


A Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea


A Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias


Tres Amigos, Brown Pelicans Pelecanus occidentailis


It's all about the eye.


Some are prettier then others.


In Texas, it's possibly a birth right to drive on the beaches.  Almost every beach in Texas is like this, from what I have seen.  You can drive on the beachs in California and Oregon also but not as easy to find a beach that allows it. (Padre Island, Corpus Christi, TX)


A Portuguese Man of War, jellyfish on a Padre Island beach.  The remedy for the sting, is to wash with salt water, not fresh water.  Applying fresh water will agitate the stinging cells and worsen the pain.  On a "Friends," episode "Monica" got stung by a Jelly on the beach and Chandler, according to the story, did the usual treatment of medicating the sting with his own urine. Usual?  I think the salt water would of worked as well and less of a public nuisance. (IPhone photo)


"Good morning," snapped Gertie.


A Texan Thistle, bigger and prettier then ours in California.


Rough and tattered, an uneasy life, drawing nectar from flowers.  A "Red Admiral" according to the following nature sign.


The "Keeled Earless Lizard."  "You say, what?"


From the Nature Trail I was on.  A poster sized rendition of what to expect on the trail and an absolute work of art.  A wonderful piece.  So I have observed, every sign I have seen in Texas's parks, is bilingual.  When in Brownsville, it seemed like the downtown stores would ask for pesos instead of dollars.  They didn't even pretend it was bilingual. Huge Mexican influence in the area.  After all, it is a border town.  Going across the border, was redundant.

Except if noted, all photos were taken with a Canon EOS 5D MKii camera body and a 100 to 400mm 1:4.5-5.6 L IS telephoto zoom lens as well as a wide angle zoom: 24-105mm L IS 1:4 USM lens.

         

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