Fungi and Lichen Gallery

Click on any "fungi" icon for a larger picture.  Unless noted otherwise, all photos taken in California.


Hygrophorus
eburneus


Trametes ochracea
aka Turkey Tails

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

1/23/04
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

1/23/04
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

1/23/04
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

1/23/04

Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, Aptos
3/3/04

Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, Aptos
3/3/04


Armillaria mellea
aka Honey Mushroom


Coprinus
aka Inky Cap

Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, Aptos
3/3/04

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

3/4/2004
Elk Horn Slough
Moss Landing

11/13/2004

Elk Horn Slough
Moss Landing
11/13/2004

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
11/24/04

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
11/25/04

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/8/05

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/8/05

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/8/05

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/16/05

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/28/05

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/28/05


Pleurotus ostreatus
aka Oyster Mushroom

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/28/05
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

2/28/05
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

3/8/05
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir

3/8/05
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
3/21/05
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
3/21/05


Omphalotus olivascens
(luminescant!)


Hygrocybe conica aka Witches Hat

Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
3/13/06
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
4/8/06
Priest Rock Trail
Lexington Reservoir
4/8/06

The Zinfindel Trail, Stevens Creek Park
2/10/06

A park off of Alpine Road
2/7/07

A park off of Alpine Road
2/7/07


I have collected and posted these pictures over several years.  I also enjoy viewing them every once in a while.  Every time I do, I re-enjoy the moment I photographed these gems. 

If you are going out to discover fungi, you need to wait for two things:  the cooler months of fall and winter and early spring, and the days after or during very wet rain storms.  Actually, a lot of night time or morning dew will also work as well.  The main fungi catalyst is coolness followed by dampness or vice-versa.

Fungi are short lived.  If you want to view them, go to the woods during the ideal growing time in Fall and Winter and go as often as you can.  Some Fungi only last a day, some may last up to a week and sometimes more.  If you would like to join me on a hike with the intent of finding fungi, drop me a line.  I can't guarantee fungi but I can guarantee that you will enjoy yourself and that there will be plenty of photography opportunities.
 
This "Fungi" Gallery is by the request of Nancy Caraway (San Leandro, CA.)  Pictures taken and posted by Jim Huffman, (c)2004 except as noted.

Identification assistance by John Brown